Sunday, 13 January 2013

Power Kite Surfing

Source(google.com.pk)
Power Kite Surfing Biography
Is a Power Kite the Same as a Kite Surfing, Snowkiting or Traction Kite?

Some people get a bit confused at first on the terminology. A power kite is is any large controllable kite designed to provide significant pull to the user. So all kitesurfing, landboarding, snowkiting, kite buggying kites are in the category of power kites. Kites that are not considered power kites would be stunt kites or those little one line kites you see on the beach.

Power kites can be flown  anywhere, can fit your own specific personality and can be done by anyone from ages 7 to 70). So it’s easy to understand why kiteboarding is one of the fastest growing sports.
Where Can You Go Kiteboarding?

One of the greatest part of getting into power kites is the ability to do it almost anywhere. You can use a kite in all of these areas:

    Lakes, oceans, rivers (Kitesurfing Kites)
    Beaches, parks, grass, parking lots (Traction Kites)
    Large open flat areas (Kite Buggy Kites)
    Any snowy surface (Snowkites)
    Absolutely anywhere (Trainer Power Kites)

It doesn’t matter if you want to kitesurf on a lake or the ocean landboard over the neighborhood hills, or snowkite up a mountain, it’s all possible.

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How to Get Started with Kitesurfing, Landboarding and Snowkiting

In order to become good at kitesurfing, landboarding or snowkiting, you will need solid kite flying skills. The more experience you have with flying a trainer or power kite, the better off you’ll be when have your first lesson. Kiteboarding is 80% kite skills, which is why we always recommend that you get some flying time in BEFORE you take a kiteboarding lesson.

trainer kite1 300x199 How to Get Started with Kitesurfing, Landboarding and Snowkiting

There’s a couple of ways you can do this. Borrow one from a friend or buy one from our online store. If you buy one, we also offer a Trade-In service (see below), which helps to reduce the overall entry cost into the sport. Which ever kite you choose, it’s best to have 15-20 hours of practice before you take a lesson.
Which kind of kite should you buy?

That depends on your goal for learning how to kite. If you want to start kite surfing, then a trainer kite such as the RUSH PRO or HYDRA will work best. If you aim is to get into landboarding, buggy kiting or snowkiting, then check out the Beamer or Scout kites.

If you are ready for a full-sized kite surfing kite, then click on the Griffin Kites page.
What is your top recommendation for a trainer kite?

We have seen that the HQ Hydra is the best overall trainer kite for most students who are looking to get into kite surfing. The reason is because a kiter can quickly transition from land to water to learn body dragging without switching kites and putting on a harness. It’s very practical to be able to take a kite you are already familiar with and start learning the water. The Hydra is the first and only water relaunchable trainer kite. It’s also a great kite for kayaks or tubes.

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How to Get Started with Kitesurfing, Landboarding and Snowkiting
What is the regular Rush kite good for?

The Rush is a really good kite for small children or a family who wants a very basic kite. We currently have a program where we have donated kites to kids with ADHD. It’s a small kite and doesn’t relaunch as easy as our other kites so it’s a bit less practical for learning than the other kites we offer. 

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